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Interactive Water Cycle Diagrams for Kids Completed

Our interactive diagrams allow you to "mouse around" the parts of the water cycle and view explanations, pictures, and more.

•   Water Science School HOME   •  The Water Cycle   •

Interactive water-cycle diagrams for students of all ages

Our interactive diagram allows you to "mouse around" the parts of the water cycle and view explanations, pictures, and more online. The diagram is available for three levels of students:

  • Intermediate

Screen capture of the advanced version of the interactive water cycle diagram

Below are other science topics associated with the water cycle.

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Evaporation Lessons & Activities for Third Grade

Related articles, examples of mold growth experiments, interactive measurement activities for 5th grade, quick & easy chemistry experiments for 10th graders.

  • Science Experiment With Rocks That Absorb Water
  • Water Lesson Plans & Activities for Third Grade

The third grade science curriculum typically covers a wide range of science topics, including evaporation and the different states of matter. Evaporation lesson plans help third grade students learn about the water cycle. These activities push the students to dig deeper about where rain comes from and where water goes. With a mix of interactive lessons, the students gain a concrete understanding of this complex process.

A drawing of the evaporation process helps third grade students understand how it works. Show a diagram of the water cycle that depicts a water source, such as a pond. Draw in arrows to show how the water evaporates out of the pond, up into the air and comes back down to the pond as precipitation. Let the kids make their own picture versions of the water cycle process.

Nature provides a hands-on learning activity about evaporation and the water cycle. Find a puddle on the playground after it rains. A sunny day helps speed the evaporation process. Let the kids measure and record information about the puddle, such as the depth in the middle and the length and width of it. Repeat the measurements and observations two or three times during the day to see if the size of the puddle changes. They can't actually see the water evaporating, but they can see the shrinking puddle size that shows how the water leaves.

An evaporation demonstration in the classroom gives the kids a controlled look at what happens to water. This experiment gives third graders a concrete way to see the water that evaporates. You can also monitor the evaporation over a longer period of time and without other people disturbing the water as you could have when observing a puddle outdoors. You need a bowl of water covered with plastic food wrap. As the water evaporates, it collects on the plastic wrap. The water drops become heavy and drop back down into the bowl, creating a working version of the water cycle in the classroom.

Experiment With It

The basic evaporation experiment with the bowl of water allows for different variables to test the evaporation process. Change variables, such as the amount of sunlight and heat or the type of liquid used in the experiment. For example, place one bowl of water in a sunny spot and another in shade to compare the evaporation rates. Use plain water in one bowl and another liquid, such as rubbing alcohol or juice, in another to see if one type of liquid evaporates faster than the other.

  • Utah Education Network: How Do You Dew?
  • Great Schools: It Evaporated!

Based in the Midwest, Shelley Frost has been writing parenting and education articles since 2007. Her experience comes from teaching, tutoring and managing educational after school programs. Frost worked in insurance and software testing before becoming a writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education with a reading endorsement.

Fifth Grade Science Experiments on H2O Evaporation

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What Is the Water Cycle?

Water can be found all over Earth in the ocean, on land and in the atmosphere. The water cycle is the path that all water follows as it moves around our planet.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Data source: NASA's Earth Observatory

On Earth, you can find water in all three states of matter: solid , liquid and gas . Liquid water is found in Earth’s oceans, rivers, lakes, streams—and even in the soil and underground. Solid ice is found in glaciers , snow, and at the North and South Poles . Water vapor—a gas—is found in Earth’s atmosphere.

How does water travel from a glacier to the ocean to a cloud? That’s where the water cycle comes in.

The Water Cycle

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Sun’s heat causes glaciers and snow to melt into liquid water. This water goes into oceans, lakes and streams. Water from melting snow and ice also goes into the soil. There, it supplies water for plants and the groundwater that we drink.

Snow falling on a glacier during winter months usually replaces any water that melts away in the summer. However, due to Earth’s overall warming , most glaciers today are losing more ice than they regain, causing them to shrink over time.

How does water get into the atmosphere? There are two main ways this happens:

  • Heat from the Sun causes water to evaporate from oceans, lakes and streams. Evaporation occurs when liquid water on Earth’s surface turns into water vapor in our atmosphere.
  • Water from plants and trees also enters the atmosphere. This is called transpiration .

Warm water vapor rises up through Earth’s atmosphere. As the water vapor rises higher and higher, the cool air of the atmosphere causes the water vapor to turn back into liquid water, creating clouds. This process is called condensation .

When a cloud becomes full of liquid water, it falls from the sky as rain or snow—also known as precipitation . Rain and snow then fill lakes and streams, and the process starts all over again.

Clouds, like these over the savannah in Nairobi, Kenya, form when water vapor in the atmosphere condenses back into liquid water. Credit: Department of State

Why Do We Care About the Water Cycle?

We care about the water cycle because water is necessary for all living things. NASA satellites orbiting Earth right now are helping us to understand what is happening with water on our planet.

an illustration of a green plant sprout growing out of the soil

Water in the Soil

Humans need water to drink, and to water the plants that grow our food. NASA has a satellite called SMAP —short for Soil Moisture Active Passive —that measures how much water is in the top 2 inches (5 cm) of Earth’s soil . This can help us understand the relationship between water in the soil and severe weather conditions, such as droughts.

an illustration of water vapor droplets floating in the atmosphere

Water in the Atmosphere

NASA’s CloudSat mission studies water in our atmosphere in the form of clouds. CloudSat gathers information about clouds and how they play a role in Earth’s climate. Also, the international satellite called the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) observes when, where and how much it rains and snows on Earth.

an illustration of a dolphin jumping out of ocean waves

Water in the Oceans

As Earth’s climate becomes warmer, land ice at the North and South Poles starts melting. The water then flows into the ocean, causing sea level to rise. NASA’s Jason-3 mission—short for Joint Altimetry Satellite Oceanography Network-3 —orbits Earth collecting information about sea level and ocean temperature. This helps track how the ocean responds to Earth’s changing climate.

NASA is also tracking how Earth’s water moves all around our planet. This is the work of the GRACE-FO —or Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-Follow On —mission. It tracks the movement of water from one month to the next, and can even measure changes in deep groundwater hundreds of feet below Earth’s surface.

NASA’s Aqua satellite also collects a large amount of information about Earth’s water cycle, including water in the oceans, clouds, sea ice, land ice and snow cover.

Related NASA Missions

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

  • Water Cycle

Weather & Climate

Societal applications, exploring the water cycle.

Exploring the Water Cycle

This lesson plan is intended for teachers to use with their upper elementary and middle school students to learn about the water cycle and the forces that drive it. The emphasis in this lesson will be on having students understand the processes that take place in moving water through Earth’s system. 

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water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

Topic outline

Water Cycle

Evaporation

When we keep anything wet in an open area, the water from the wet things changes in water vapor and mixes with the air around. We cannot see the water vapor evaporating as it is color less. This process of changing liquid water into gas or vapor is called Evaporation . Water vapor is the gaseous form of water.

When we place handkerchief on cloth line outside in windy place or under the sun, it dries faster. This means that wind and heat from the sun helps in evaporation. This is why we hang our wet clothes out in the sun for drying.  With the increase in temperature, the rate of evaporation also increases. Evaporation occurs every day in natural as well as in our manmade environment.

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

Condensation

The process in which a gas changes into its liquid state is called condensation. The water vapor condenses when it is very cold. What do you observe when you keep a glass of cold water on hot summer day? We see droplets of water on the surface of the glass. From where does this droplets came? It actually came from the air.  Water vapor in the warm air, changes back into liquid when it touches the cold surface of glass.

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

Example: Due on grass in the morning, water droplets on the outside surface of the cold drink bottle, water droplets on the mirror of bathroom after hot shower.

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

There is limited water on the earth and exists as solid in the form of snow on the mountains, ice in glaciers and ice caps; it exists in the form of liquid in the rivers, ocean, sea and underground water; it exists as gas in the form of water vapor and steam. The total amount of water on the earth is relatively unchanging, and it has remained about the same since our planet's formation. The water is constantly undergoing process of evaporation and transpiration, condensation, precipitation and accumulation. This journey of water is called water cycle . The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

The water cycle is made up of following processes:

Evaporation and Transpiration

Heat of the sun causes evaporation of water from rivers, lakes and the ocean. The water vapor formed rises and mix up with air. Evaporation is an important part of the water cycle and occurs continuously throughout the nature.

Plants require water to make their food, which they obtain from the soil. Plants releases water from leaves which evaporates into the air.

Water vapor evaporates from water bodies in the air, it condenses and changes into tiny droplets and then clouds are formed.

Precipitation

When these droplets become so dense and heavy, they come back to the earth in the form of rain, hail, sleet or snow. Precipitation is responsible for bringing back the fresh water on the earth.

Accumulation

When water falls back on earth, it gets collected in the ocean, lakes or river or under the ground.

Water is continuously recycled on the earth; from water bodies to the sky and down to land, to be transported back to the water bodies again.

Importance of water cycle

We use water for drinking and for other purpose. We have limited water on earth and if the water did not come back to us through the water cycle then we would not have fresh water. So, we should use water judiciously and avoid wasting water.

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The water cycle

Where does all the water go.

The four steps in the water cycle are precipitation (rain, snow), collection of fluids into bodies of water, evaporation of water into the sky and condensation of water vapour into clouds. Then it rains again!

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

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Water Cycle

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3rd Grade Water Cycle

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15 questions

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_________________ is when the sun's heat causes liquid water to become water vapor.

condensation

evaporation

precipitation

transpiration

_________________ is when water vapor gets cooler and changes back into liquid water to form clouds.

Snow, sleet, hail, and rain are all forms of _____________________.

__________________ is when rainwater flows downhill toward a body of water.

percolation

accumulation

  • 6. Multiple Choice 45 seconds 1 pt Which of these is an example of precipitation? snow air clouds vapor
  • 9. Multiple Choice 45 seconds 1 pt Where is most water found on Earth? glaciers lakes rivers oceans
  • 10. Multiple Choice 45 seconds 1 pt What source of energy evaporates the most water from Earth’s surface? volcanoes the sun lightning wind

Letter A is representing what part of the water cycle?

Letter B is representing what part of the water cycle?

Letter C is representing what part of the water cycle?

Letter D is representing what part of the water cycle?

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THE WATER CYCLE! EVAPORATION, CONDENSATION, AND PRECIPITATION!, Grade 3 Scien

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THE WATER CYCLE! EVAPORATION, CONDENSATION,

AND PRECIPITATION!, Grade 3 Science Bulletin Board

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The words in this product read: THE WATER CYCLE!

EVAPORATION, CONDENSATION, AND PRECIPITATION!

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  • Biology Article

Water Cycle

water cycle evaporation assignment 3rd grade

What is the Water Cycle? Water Cycle Diagram Stages of Water Cycle Implications of Water Cycle Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Water Cycle?

The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle or the hydrological cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth.

Water Cycle Diagram

During this process, water changes its state from one phase to another, but the total number of water particles remains the same. In other words, if it were possible to collect and boil 100 gms of water, it will still retain a mass of 100 gms as steam. Likewise, if 100 gms of steam is collected and condensed, the resultant water would still weight 100 gms.

Water cycle

Water changes its state through a variety of processes from evaporation, melting and freezing, to sublimation, condensation, and deposition. All these changes require the application of energy.

Stages of Water Cycle

There are many processes involved in the movement of water apart from the major steps given in the above water cycle diagram. Listed below are different stages of the water cycle.

1. Evaporation

The sun is the ultimate source of energy, and it powers most of the evaporation that occurs on earth. Evaporation generally happens when water molecules at the surface of water bodies become excited and rise into the air. These molecules with the highest kinetic energy accumulate into water vapour clouds. Evaporation usually takes place below the boiling point of water. Another process called evapotranspiration occurs when evaporation occurs through the leaves of plants. This process contributes to a large percentage of water in the atmosphere.

2. Sublimation

Sublimation occurs when snow or ice changes directly into water vapour without becoming water. It usually occurs as a result of dry winds and low humidity. Sublimation can be observed on mountain peaks, where the air pressure is quite low. The low air pressure helps to sublimate the snow into water vapour as less energy is utilised in the process. Another example of sublimation is the phase where fog bellows from dry ice. On earth, the primary source of sublimation is from the ice sheets covering the poles of the earth.

3. Condensation

The water vapour that accumulated in the atmosphere eventually cools down due to the low temperatures found at high altitudes. These vapours become tiny droplets of water and ice, eventually coming together to form clouds.

4. Precipitation

Above 0 degrees centigrade, the vapours will condense into water droplets. However, it cannot condense without dust or other impurities. Hence, water vapours attach itself on to the particle’s surface. When enough droplets merge, it falls out of the clouds and on to the ground below. This process is called precipitation (or rainfall). In particularly cold weather or extremely low air pressure, the water droplets freeze and fall as snow or hail.

5. Infiltration

Rainwater gets absorbed into the ground through the process of infiltration. The level of absorption varies based on the material the water has seeped into. For instance, rocks will retain comparatively less water than soil. Groundwater can either follows streams or rivers. But sometimes, it might just sink deeper, forming aquifers.

If the water from rainfall does not form aquifers, it follows gravity, often flowing down the sides of mountains and hills; eventually forming rivers. This process is called runoff. In colder regions, icecaps form when the amount of snowfall is faster than the rate of evaporation or sublimation. The biggest icecaps on earth are found at the poles.

All the steps mentioned above occur cyclically with neither a fixed beginning nor an end.

Also Read:  Back to the Oceans

Implications of Water Cycle

  • The water cycle has a tremendous impact on the climate. For instance, the greenhouse effect will cause a rise in temperature. Without the evaporative cooling effect of the water cycle, the temperature on earth would rise drastically.
  • The water cycle is also an integral part of other biogeochemical cycles.
  • Water cycle affects all life processes on earth.
  • The water cycle is also known the clean the air. For instance, during the process of precipitation, water vapours have to attach themselves on to particles of dust. In polluted cities, the raindrops, apart from picking up dust, also pick up water-soluble gas and pollutants as they fall from the clouds. Raindrops are also known to pick up biological agents such as bacteria and industrial soot particles and smoke.

Read more about the water cycle with diagram by registering @  BYJU’S Biology

  • Biogeochemical cycles
  • Oxygen Cycle
  • Carbon Cycle
  • Nitrogen Cycle

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the major 4 steps in the water cycle.

The major 4 steps are evaporation of water, then condensation, precipitation and collection. The sun evaporates water sources and contributes to the formation of water vapor. These water vapour accumulate in the atmosphere as clouds. The vapours condense into water droplets and when enough droplets merge, it falls out of the clouds as rain.

What is the difference between evaporation and condensation?

Evaporation is a process by which water changes into water vapour. Condensation is an opposite process by which water vapour is converted into tiny droplets of water.

Why is water cycle important?

Water cycle has a huge impact on determining the global climate. It is also an integral part of other biogeochemical cycles. It affects all life processes on Earth either directly or indirectly.

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  1. Water Cycle Diagram # Very Simple Diagram or Drawing of water cycle # Evaporation, Transpiration

  2. The Water Cycle

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  4. water cycle... evaporation --heat transfer practical class with household equipment

  5. water cycle assignment #science project holiday homework 😊😊🌷🌷

  6. Water Cycle(evaporation, condensation, precipitation, collection); transpiration also💦💦

COMMENTS

  1. PDF The Water Cycle

    Grade 3 Unit 4 Lesson 4 The Water Cycle.ppt The Water Cycle Water has been around for billions of years Water gets recycled over and over again Image courtesy of US Environmental Protection Agency What is the Water Cycle? Transpiration Evaporation Condensation Precipitation Accumulation This is the water cycle! condensation transpiration

  2. PDF Exploring the Water Cycle Teacher's Guide

    3rd-5th grade: Most of Earth's water is in the ocean and much of the Earth's fresh water is in glaciers or underground. 6th- 8th grade: Water cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere, and is propelled by sunlight and gravity. Density variations of sea water drive interconnected ocean currents.

  3. 11 Activities to Teach Water Cycle Science

    1. Miniature Model Water Cycle In the Make a Miniature Water Cycle Model activity, students make a model of the water cycle in a plastic bag and use it to explore how water moves in and out of the atmosphere in a cycle of precipitation, evaporation, and condensation.

  4. The Water Cycle

    While meant for grades 4-6, the story could easily be rewritten for older grades as a "forensic science" case. Water Purification by Evaporation and Condensation (PDF) An activity to illustrate how the water cycle helps to purify water. Condensation Make a Cloud in a Bottle

  5. 3rd grade The Water Cycle Flashcards

    3rd grade The Water Cycle Flashcards Q-Chat Get a hint The Water Cycle Click the card to flip 👆 The PROCESS by which water MOVES through the EARTH and ATMOSPHERE. Click the card to flip 👆 1 / 8 1 / 8 Learn Created by Chassidyelaine Students also viewed Matter- Ch.2 Vocab Teacher17 terms colek6206 Preview Matter Ch.2 Review Teacher24 terms colek6206

  6. Interactive Water Cycle Diagrams for Kids Completed

    Our interactive diagram allows you to "mouse around" the parts of the water cycle and view explanations, pictures, and more online. The diagram is available for three levels of students: Sources/Usage: Public Domain. This is a screenshot of one of our interactive water-cycle diagrams. Click one of the levels above to start exploring!

  7. PDF Microsoft Word

    Identify the stages in the water cycle (evaporation, condensations, precipitation, ground water, transpiration). K2. Explain the relationship between evaporation and condensation within the water cycle. K3. Describe that melting and evaporation require the addition of heat energy and condensations and freezing require removal of heat energy.

  8. Water Cycle (3-5 Version) Video For Kids

    The Fossil Record. How To Be A Scientist (College & Careers) Learn the steps of the water cycle: evaporation, condensation and percipitation. Our fun science video for kids in 3rd, 4th & 5th grade breaks it down!

  9. 3rd Grade Water Cycle

    1. Multiple Choice 45 seconds 1 pt How does the water cycle begin? with the Sun's energy with the ocean's energy with wind power with rain energy 2. Multiple Choice 45 seconds 1 pt _________________ is when the sun's heat causes liquid water to become water vapor. condensation evaporation precipitation transpiration 3. Multiple Choice 45 seconds

  10. Evaporation Lessons & Activities for Third Grade

    Evaporation lesson plans help third grade students learn about the water cycle. These activities push the students to dig deeper about where rain comes from and where water goes. With a...

  11. What Is the Water Cycle?

    There are two main ways this happens: Heat from the Sun causes water to evaporate from oceans, lakes and streams. Evaporation occurs when liquid water on Earth's surface turns into water vapor in our atmosphere. Water from plants and trees also enters the atmosphere. This is called transpiration.

  12. Exploring the Water Cycle

    In this lesson, students will learn about the water cycle and how energy from the sun and the force of gravity drive this cycle. This website, presented by NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, provides students and educators with resources to learn about Earth's water cycle, weather and climate, and the technology and societal applications of studying them.

  13. 3rd grade Science Water Cycle Study Guide Flashcards

    3rd grade Science Water Cycle Study Guide Flashcards Learn Test Match Q-Chat Get a hint Explain what the water cycle is. Click the card to flip 👆 movement of water from the ground to the air and back to the ground by the process of: evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. Click the card to flip 👆 1 / 37 1 / 37 Flashcards Learn Test Match

  14. Evaporation

    With some help from the sun, evaporation occurs every day. Water on the Earth, whether it is in the ocean, in a puddle, or in your pool, will evaporate into the atmosphere. When water is heated by the sun, it gains enough energy to turn into water vapor and rise to the sky.

  15. Topic: Water Cycle

    This journey of water is called water cycle. The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle. The water cycle is made up of following processes: Evaporation and Transpiration. Heat of the sun causes evaporation of water from rivers, lakes and the ocean. The water vapor formed rises and mix up with air. Evaporation is an important part of ...

  16. Water Cycle

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like Water Cycle, Evaporation, Condensation and more. ... Water Cycle - 3rd Grade. Flashcards. Learn. Test. Match. Flashcards. Learn. Test. Match. Created by. bmgentile. Terms in this set (6) Water Cycle. The cycle through which water on Earth moves. Includes such processes as ...

  17. The Water Cycle Worksheets

    The water cycle worksheets - students learn the 4 key words of the water cycle: precipitation, collection, evaporation and condensation. Free | Printable | Grade 2 | Science | Worksheets

  18. Evaporation

    The sun heats the water in river, lakes, and ocean! The water then rises up to the air in the form of water vapor. Water vapor is the gas form of water. This is the process of evaporation. Water can also be evaporated from plants through a process called transpiration. Transpiration occurs when the water on the leaves of a plant turn into water vapor and rise to the air.

  19. Water cycle

    The sun. What are the three processes that are involved in the water cycle? Evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. Where can water be stored or accumulated? Rivers, lakes, underground, ponds, and streams. Define the water cycle. Movement of water from the ground to the air and then back to the ground. What is evaporation.

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  21. 3rd Grade Water Cycle

    3rd Grade Water Cycle quiz for 3rd grade students. Find other quizzes for Science and more on Quizizz for free! 33 Qs . Water Cycle 5.6K plays 11th - 12th 17 Qs ... Evaporation happens when the sun _____ water and turns it into vapor. cools. heats up. freezes. lights up. 8. Multiple Choice. 45 seconds.

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  23. Water Cycle

    1. Evaporation The sun is the ultimate source of energy, and it powers most of the evaporation that occurs on earth. Evaporation generally happens when water molecules at the surface of water bodies become excited and rise into the air. These molecules with the highest kinetic energy accumulate into water vapour clouds.